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Educational Articles

Dogs + Care & Wellness

  • Canine hot spots are red, inflamed skin lesions also known as pyotraumatic dermatitis or acute moist dermatitis. These painful, smelly sores may be very obvious or may be hidden beneath matted fur. Hot spots are usually caused by self-trauma when a dog scratches an itchy spot so vigorously that he creates an open wound.

  • The stings of bees, wasps, and hornets, and the bites of ants and spiders all spell trouble for the nosy dog. Insect venom causes problems ranging from mild irritation to life-threatening shock.

  • Although most limps need veterinary attention, there are a few first aid measures you can perform at home if your dog is hobbling around.

  • Successful airline travel with a dog begins long before the day of travel. It requires planning and preparation in order to make the experience as enjoyable as possible for both you and your dog.

  • Frostbite or congelatio in medical terminology is the damage that is caused to skin and other tissues due to extreme cold. When the environmental temperature drops below 32°F (0°C), blood vessels close to the skin start to narrow or constrict.

  • When you bring a new puppy into your home there will inevitably be a period of adjustment. Your goals are to help your puppy to quickly bond to its new family, and to minimize the stress associated with leaving its mother, litter mates, and former home.

  • “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”. Dogs, like people, need routine medical exams to stay healthy. Since dogs age more rapidly than people, they need well-health check-ups not once, but twice a year. To really stay on top of things, you can you can give your dog a quick and easy home exam between scheduled veterinary visits.

  • Unfortunately, our pets do not live as long as we do. When the time comes to say goodbye, we experience feelings and emotions that sometimes embarrass us, and often confuse us. These feelings actually follow a well-recognized cycle, with stages of mourning and grief that are universal and are experienced by everyone to a greater or lesser extent following the loss of a loved one, be it a person or a pet. If you feel particularly vulnerable or feel that you are having difficulty with the mourning cycle, do not be afraid to discuss this with your family doctor or your veterinarian.

  • The general condition of your dog’s skin and coat are good indicators of its health. Although health and nutrition influence the luster and texture of your pet’s coat from the inside, regular grooming and skin care on the outside will help keep your dog’s coat clean and free of tangles, no matter what type of hair coat he or she has.

  • Halitosis is an offensive odor coming from the oral cavity.