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Educational Articles

Cats + Care & Wellness

  • Advances in veterinary awareness and diagnostics not only means cats are now living longer and with a better quality of life than ever before, but it also means the likelihood of diagnosing cancer during a cat's life has increased.

  • Interactive feeders that require a pet to think and work for their food call upon the natural instinct to hunt or forage. Besides being fun, these food puzzles may help both physical and behavioral problems in cats and dogs. When used correctly, interactive feeders may benefit pets that eat too quickly, become bored when alone, or suffer from separation anxiety.

  • The various stages of reproduction – heat (estrus), pregnancy, lactation, and weaning – provide unique stresses to the body. Each provides specific nutritional concerns that should be addressed to maximize both queen and kitten health.

  • Feeding your cat can be easily accomplished with mealtimes on a set schedule. At least two meals per day are best for your cat. The use of food toys or interactive feeders adds interest to your cat’s mealtime. Routines help your cat adjust to changes that may occur in your home as well as allow you to monitor her health.

  • Once your cat has reached adulthood, their nutrient profile will change from when they were a kitten. Your veterinarian can help you determine what proportion of each nutrient is needed based on your cat's lifestyle and current body condition. It is important to lay a good nutritional foundation to maximize the health and longevity for your cat and reduce the potential for developing obesity.

  • Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a virus that infects only cats. There is no treatment for FeLV, therefore preventing infection through vaccination is highly recommended. Testing prior to vaccination is needed to ensure the cat is not already infected with FeLV, as it offers no protection to an infected cat. A small few cats may experience a mild reaction to the FeLV vaccine, but the benefits of vaccination outweigh the risks.

  • The internet covers a lot of terrain and includes vast amounts of knowledge. Unfortunately, copious amounts of information doesn't always equate to accurate information. While we know that the internet is a great source of information, we must also realize that it can be a source of misinformation. So how do you know what internet sources you should trust when it comes to finding information on pets and pet care?

  • A tiny tear in a tiny nail on a single toe on a single foot can be the source of excruciating pain.

  • Even though cats usually land on their feet, they can still sustain injuries when they fall.

  • The tail is an important part of the feline anatomy and is actually an extension of the spine. The wagging tail is a communication tool in the feline world, so a cat that doesn't wag his tail is an indication that something might be wrong. Common tail injuries in the cat include abrasions, lacerations, fractured tail, and nerve damage.