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Educational Articles

Cats + Care & Wellness

  • Did you know that you can help your veterinarian treat your pet's heart disease by counting their breathing rate at home, and watching for other clues that your pet is not doing as well as you think? Using simple techniques, you can learn how to become an invaluable part of your pet's healthcare team.

  • Providing hospice care for pets as they approach their end of life is a relatively young discipline within veterinary medicine. Although the foundational principles of veterinary hospice care are derived fairly directly from those of human hospice care, there are some critical differences between providing hospice care to a human family member and providing hospice care to an animal family member.

  • Hospice care for pets is an emerging niche of veterinary medicine that creates and relies on a unique caring collaboration between the pet owner and members of the veterinary healthcare team. Pet hospice is patterned after the delivery of the end-of-life care provided for human patients, with the additional provision from the veterinarian for humane euthanasia when the pet's day-to-day quality of life becomes unacceptable.

  • Many think that because cats are finicky eaters they are poisoned less often than dogs. However, with their curiosity and fastidious grooming, intoxication is, unfortunately, not uncommon. Several factors predispose cats to becoming ill once they have been exposed to even a small amount of a poisonous substance.

  • Recognizing and treating pain in cats has evolved dramatically over time. We understand that because cats are living longer and longer, they are also experiencing the deterioration and debilitation that go along with aging. Pain cannot be treated unless and until it is unmasked.

  • Pain is very difficult to detect in older cats. It is important for cat owners to monitor their cats for subtle clues including changes in grooming, litter box behavior, and degree of activity. If changes in these behaviors are observed, your cat should be evaluated by your veterinarian and a pain management plan devised.

  • It is a myth that cats who live indoors don't need to be vaccinated against infectious diseases. While living an indoor lifestyle is certainly safer overall than living outdoors, and indoor living contributes to a longer life expectancy, important infectious diseases can find cats anyway.

  • Ear cleaning is not usually necessary in cats. Most cats are fine without it, but for those who are prone to wax build-up and/or ear infections, ear cleaning is a very important part of your cat's hygiene needs. Cleaning your dog's ears does not require any special equipment. Your veterinarian can help you decide how often your dog's ears should be cleaned.

  • Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) is a condition that is also commonly referred to as dry eye. The medical term means inflammation of the cornea and surrounding tissues from drying. It is a common eye condition resulting from inadequate production of the aqueous portion of the tear film by the lacrimal gland and/or the third eyelid gland. In chronic cases, there may be a history of eye injury, ulcers, or conjunctivitis.

  • Most cats by nature prefer to use a soil type surface for elimination. By providing a litter box with an appropriate and appealing substrate (material), few cats will need to be trained to use it. At about 30-36 days of age kittens leave the nest to search out a loose substrate for elimination.