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Educational Articles

Birds

  • A pet bird is entirely reliant on you for everything in its life. Its well-being is dependent on you, the caring pet bird owner. It is important to continually strive to better your bird's life and help ensure the maintenance of a long lasting, healthy relationship between you and your bird.

  • If you saw a person have a seizure or fall down the stairs or wreck a car, what would you do? You'd call 911. But what should you do when the crisis involves your pet? You call a pet emergency number. Ask your veterinary hospital how they handle after-hour emergencies.

  • Contrary to popular belief, pet birds not raised with other birds typically bond to their owners and are unlikely to want to live with another new bird. If you feel your bird is lonely or bored, first consider providing more enrichment in the form of safe toys and entertainment. If you decide you want to introduce another bird into your household, be sure you are ready to take on the work of caring for more than one bird and be certain to introduce him slowly. All new birds should be checked by a veterinarian before exposing the original bird to a new one, and the new bird should be quarantined in a separate, isolated room within the house for 30-45 days. Some birds never accept new birds in their territories. Consult your veterinarian if you are experiencing problems.

  • Kidneys are paired organs in the abdomen that filter the waste products of metabolism from the blood for excretion from the body. They are also important in maintaining water and electrolyte balance in the body.

  • While many owners believe parasites are common causes of skin disorders and feather loss in birds, this is usually not the case. However, Knemidokoptic mange, also called cere mites or scaly face is a relatively common disorder, particularly in some of the smaller species of birds.

  • Lead is a common household hazard for birds. Due to the curious, explorative nature, house birds can be exposed to lead around the house (compared to wild birds which are frequently poisoned by lead sinkers or by being shot with lead bullets). Lead causes heavy metal toxicity, affecting the blood, nervous system and gastrointestinal system. Lead poisoning can be fatal if not treated.

  • Leg bands are often applied by the breeder to help identify and keep track of their birds. Breeders usually apply closed (solid) rings or bands at an early age when the small feet will fit through the hole.

  • The liver is an important organ that is involved with digesting food, storing and filtering the blood, and with many other metabolic functions. Because it has so many functions, a healthy liver is extremely important.

  • Our knowledge of bird nutrition is constantly evolving. This is due both to heightened awareness of the importance of nutrition and to increased research into birds different needs. As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals and water. Different species of birds often require different foods.

  • There are approximately 50 species of Lories and Lorikeets (subfamily Loriidae) distributed widely throughout southeastern Asia, Papua New Guinea, Australia and Polynesia. These birds come in a delightful assortment of sizes and brilliant, glossy colors.